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Autistic children in Australia have no right to education

Bob Buckley

I am not a lawyer, so you cannot rely on my opinion; make sure you should get professional advice in relation to this subject.

The US Supreme Court is about to hear a case about the quality of education for an autistic student - see http://www.bazelon.org/In-Court/Current-...

incredible numbers of 'school students with disability'

Bob Buckley

Recently, the Education Council released its first report based on data collected for the Nationally Consistent Collection of Data: School Students with Disability.

The report describes 18% of school students as having disability. This rate of disability among school students in the major states (see Table 3 in the report) aligns remarkably closely with the average disability rate (18%) in the Australian population. But this level of disability is far more students than other reports of children with disability.

Government persists with same old disability vilification strategy ... expecting a different employment result

Yet again, the Government is kicking people off welfare benefits hoping that they will move into jobs (see Crackdown throws thousands off disability support pension).  This pathetic repetition of oft tried and always failed approach comes from a Government that is crowing about innovation: it clearly shows Governments cannot come up with a new approach. 

What is "autism"? ... a personal/family perspective

Bob Buckley

To me “autism” means autism spectrum disorder (ASD) which the DSM-5 describes entirely in terms of behaviour, usually a child's behaviour.

The DSM-5, a manual of mental disorders, provides the diagnostic criteria for ASD. Previously, the DSM-IV described a category of disorders called Pervasive Developmental Disorders that included Autistic Disorder, Asperger's Disorder and PDD-NOS. The World Health Organisation replicated the definition, albeit with different names, in its ICD-10.

Is there room at the advocacy table?

by Renee Bugg

It can be hard for parents to take a step back and allow their children to have their own voices. However, when it comes to advocacy, it’s especially important to find the right balance. Here Renee Bugg, parent to Poss who is on the Autistic Spectrum, talks about how they’re meeting the challenge.

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